Geography

Geography

Autumn Term

Topic
Overview

Our Natural World. 

Rivers Unit – Distinctive

Landscapes

The UK contains a diverse and distinct range of landscapes. This topic looks to unravel the geographical processes that make them distinctive. A deeper understanding of the geomorphic processes that shape river and coastal landscapes will be developed and consideration of the human influences on these. The unit is designed to enable pupils to understand and identify differences in geomorphic processes and relate this to more detailed and comprehensive study of river landforms and the human interactions that take place with rivers. 

  • Pupils will be able to explain how geomorphic processes can be classified.
  • They should also be able to identify, describe and explain the formation of some distinctive landforms in river landscapes such as floodplains, meanders, waterfalls and v shape valleys
  • They should analyse models of changing river landforms e.g. the Bradshaw model.
  • Investigate how examples of geomorphic processes operate.
  • Analyse and evaluate the impact and interconnections that exist between people and patterns and processes operating along a river in the UK
  • Investigate, analyse and evaluate how attempts are made to manage rivers.
  • Pupils use independent fieldwork activities to help carry out enquiries (investigation) into changing river characteristics to help prepare for the examined fieldwork components. Fieldwork is part of this unit with completion of coursework based on Edale Valley in Derbyshire. The focus is on how rivers work to produce a distinctive landscape – testing the Bradshaw model.

Our Natural World. 

Coasts Unit – Distinctive Landscapes

By the end of the coastal unit, the students should be able to:-

  • Describe what a landscape is and identify the differences between natural and built landscapes.
  • Have an overview of where the physical landscapes are in the UK.
  • Be able to identify, describe and explain the formation of some distinctive landforms in coastal landscapes such as spits, headlands & bays.
  • Students should also be able to apply this understanding to located case studies in each landscape type, and explain how humans influence the processes and so have an impact on the landscape.

Social, Moral, Spiritual & Cultural and British Values Links

    • BV: Rights and responsibilities / Respect and tolerance.
    • SMSC– moral values / ethical issues /community and society function.

 

Careers, Advice, Information & Guidance Links

Connecting careers. Risk management.

 

Home Learning this Term

To support the learning within the subject and to help prepare for GCSE level challenge, pupils will be expected to undertake independent activities outside of the lesson and prepare for class activities through directed enquiry. The nature of this activity will be based around employing a range of geographical skills as well as researching ideas that will share a thematic link to their unit work within the Autumn term. Themes are revisited and further developed in different contexts as pupils work with the material in each unit. Coursework is no longer

completed however a substantial fieldwork exercise will need to be written up in this term.

 

 

Spring Term

Topic
Overview

Our Natural World. 

Global Hazards 

Weather hazards unit

The natural world contains a rich diversity of distinctive landscapes and ecosystems which are constantly changing through physical processes and human interactions. This component gives pupils the opportunity to explore the natural world they live in, to understand why it looks the way it does and appreciate its value. It includes investigation of global hazards which humans face as well as an examination of how the climate is changing and what this means for the world today. Pupils study the distinctive landscapes that surround them and the ecosystems that help sustain the life on Earth.

Our Natural World.

Global Hazards 

Tectonic hazards  unit

As a theme within this unit pupils develop and develop their knowledge and understanding of atmospheric circulation to explain weather related hazards such as El Nino, tropical storms, droughts and heat waves. They use geographical skills to investigate the distribution, density and changing patterns of these hazardsPupils are taught to:

  • Outline the global atmospheric circulation system including the effects of high and low pressure belts in creating climatic belts.
  • Understand how the global circulation of the atmosphere causes extremes in weather conditions in different parts of the world.
  • Know the extremes in weather conditions associated with wind, temperature, and precipitation in two contrasting countries.
  • Know the distribution and frequency of tropical storms and drought and how these patterns may have changed over time.
  • Be able to describe & explain the causes of the extreme weather conditions associated with tropical storms.
  • Be able to outline the causes of the extreme weather conditions associated with El Nino / La Nina leading to drought.
  • Know and understand the place specific causes (including extreme weather conditions), consequences and responses to two contrasting weather hazards. These two hazards are tropical storms and heatwaves.

The tectonics unit will start three weeks before Easter.

As part of the unit on tectonic hazards pupils look at how plate tectonics shapes our world? They should be able to:

  • Outline the structure of the earth and how it is linked to the processes of plate tectonics including convection currents.
  • Describe and explain the processes that take place at constructive, destructive, conservative and collision plate boundaries as well as hot spots.
  • Know how plate movement causes earthquakes (including shallow and deep focus) and volcanoes (shield and composite).
  • Know and understand the place specific causes, consequences and responses to a tectonic hazard case study from the 21st
  • This requires detailed knowledge of one volcanic eruption and one earthquake event.
  • Analyse how technological development – building design, prediction techniques, early warning systems can help mitigate the impacts of a tectonic hazard.

Pupils should develop and use enquiry skills including GIS technology and statistical data to carry out an enquiry comparing different world regions analysing the data to help compare and reach conclusions about the spatial differences in hazard occurrence.

Social, Moral, Spiritual & Cultural and British Values Links

    • BV: Rule of law. Liberty. Respect & tolerance
    • SMSC: Community and society function.

 

Careers, Advice, Information & Guidance Links

Connecting careers. Risk management strategies in MEDC / LEDC locations.

 

Home Learning this Term

To support the learning within the subject and to help prepare for GCSE level challenge, pupils will be expected to research the physical and human geography factors influencing hazards. They should explore, analyse and evaluate hazard impacts in countries at different levels of development. To help understand their focus areas they will be expected to complete comparative investigations of climatic and tectonic hazard case studies. Developing and retaining a wider level of locational knowledge in connection to the hazard themes studied is a key focus.

 

 

Summer Term

Topic
Overview

Our Natural World.

Changing Climate Unit

This unit is designed to enable pupils to gain knowledge and understanding of the evidence supporting the idea of climate change.

In this unit pupils learn about:

  • What influences the global pattern of climate change from the beginning of the quaternary period to the present day?
  • They learn to explain, analyse and reach conclusions about the range and reliability of evidence relating to climate change including evidence from sea ice positions, ice cores, global temperature data, paintings and diaries.
  • They must be able to outline the causes of natural climate change including the theories of sun spots, volcanic eruptions and Milankovitch cycles.
  • They investigate the natural greenhouse effect and the impacts that humans have on the atmosphere, including the enhanced greenhouse effect.
  • Pupils explore and evaluate a range of social, economic and environmental impacts of climate change worldwide such as those resulting from sea level rise and extreme weather events. (21st century)
  • Pupils explore and evaluate a range of social, economic and environmental impacts of climate change within the UK such as the impact on weather patterns, seasonal changes and changes in industry. (21st century).

Pupils will use and develop their geographical skills to investigate, describe, explain and analyse data to carry out their investigation of natural and enhanced climate change. 

Our Natural World.

Sustaining Ecosystems Unit.

As a theme within this unit pupils develop their knowledge and understanding of the concept of ecosystems: - rainforests and polar environments are the focus.

  • They need to know it relates to the interdependence of climate, soil, water, plants and animals.
  • Pupils have to be able to outline the global distribution of biomes.
  • They should have an overview of the climate, flora and fauna within these ecosystems.
  • Pupils must examine the distinctive characteristics of a tropical rainforest ecosystem, including climate, nutrient cycle, soil profile and water cycle.
  • They should be able to describe and explain the interdependence of climate, soil, water, plants, animals and human activity in tropical rainforests.
  • Pupils explore the value of tropical rainforests through the study of their goods and services.
  • They must be able to evaluate human impacts in the tropical rainforest.
  • Pupils have to be able to outline one case study of sustainable management of an area of tropical rainforest.

In comparison pupils should be able to:

  • Outline the distinctive characteristics of Antarctica and the Artic – including climate, features of the land, sea and flora and fauna.
  • Describe and explain the interdependence of climate, soil, water, plants, animals and human activity in either the Arctic or Antarctic polar regions. Explore a range of human activity impacts on either ecosystem.
  • Outline one case study of small scale sustainable management.
  • Outline one case study of global scale sustainable management.

Pupils will use and develop their geographical skills to investigate, describe, explain and analyse data to carry out their investigation of comparative ecosystems.

Social, Moral, Spiritual & Cultural and British Values Links

    • BV: Rule of Law. Mutual respect / tolerance.
    • SMSC: Spiritual, community and society function.

 

Careers, Advice, Information & Guidance Links

Connecting careers. Environmental sciences.

 

Home Learning this Term

To support the learning within the subject and to help prepare for GCSE level challenges, pupils will be expected to undertake independent activities outside of the lesson and prepare for class activities through directed enquiry. The nature of this activity will be based around employing a range of geographical skills as well as researching ideas that will share a thematic link to their unit work within the Summer term. They will also possibly be expected to research interconnections and links associated with the social, economic and environmental impacts at the specified scale e.g. Tuvalu / UK and develop case study material connected to sustainable management at the specified range of scales.

 

 

Year 10 Geography Summary

During Yr10 pupils will continue to build on the core knowledge and understanding of place, location, processes and enquiry skills that they have developed in KS3, but also expand their spatial knowledge and understanding at a wider scale with greater emphasis on the more detailed physical and human elements of the places studied. They should be able to see that these components share many interconnections at an increasingly wider range of scales. They will utilize a wider range of resources and develop an understanding of how to analyse these from both a spatial and graphical perspective. Their enquiry work will allow them to explore and develop the ability to structure analytical responses to collected fieldwork data in a physical context and also to evaluate a wider range of geographical resources.